Wellspring: creation, Part II.

The sculpture sat, unloved, in the studio for quite a while as we sorted out a good install date. Eventually, it was time to load it up, haul it to Adams County, and install it. Getting it onto the trailer seemed to be a fearful task to a lot of my cohorts, but it ended up being a matter of a simple plan, well executed. I bought some heavy-duty casters (600 lb. load rating) and bolted them onto the exposed “legs” of the superstructure. This simplified the act of moving it into place on the trailer’s deck, and it also made lifting the piece into a vertical orientation with the crane much easier. Next, I picked the base end up high enough to allow the trailer to roll underneath, and supported it that position with a crossmember of leftover square tubing and two of my super-badass “saw” horses.

 

Backed the trailer under the piece, removed the crossmember, picked up the top end, and rolled the sculpture to the fromt of the trailer. Wah. La. All that was left was strapping it down, slapping some hazard flags on it, and loading up the tools for the install the next day.

 

My little Tacoma did a fine job of hauling this rig, despite the weight – “Wellspring” tips the scales at just 850 pounds, but the trailer is a beefy one at around 3K. (Thanks go to fellow Guild member and all-around good guy Denny Haskew for the use of his trailer.) An hour and a half later, and National Sculptors’ Guild honcho John Kinkade and I were on site, getting ready and waiting for our crane. It was a beautiful day, a beautiful crane, and a beautiful installation – we were done in less than an hour.

 

 

So, there you have it. Done.

 

 

One Reply to “Wellspring: creation, Part II.”

  1. I'm pretty sure that's how Stonehenge was built.Awesome sculpture BTW. I'm excited that you've incorporated glass (or some sort of translucent material). I remember you talking about wanting to do that "back in the day."

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