Exocubic Studio

Exocubic Studio

Split Infinitive, re-worked.

I designed this piece way back when Sketch-Up was my main software for modeling. I was pretty happy with the way it turned out, but over the course of its fabrication the first time around, I discovered a pile of things that could have been done better to yield a smoother and less laborious process. Chief among the changes was making the thing symmetrical vertically, which enabled me to eliminate two entire butt joints in the sheet metal, which means significantly less grinding - which means a much happier Humble Narrator. I used my original Sketch-Up model, importing it into Rhino so I could have a starting place for the geometry:

Split infinitive sketchup

Mesh edges from Sketch-Up. ^

 

After a whole bunch of mucking about and snapping new construction curves to that stuff, I was able to get a cleaner version that had the added benefits of being easier to fab AND better aesthetics.

Split infinitive rhino

Fixed up in Rhino - and natively on my Mac in the Rhino Beta for OSX. ^

From there, I used Rhino's Unroll command and some patience to arrive at a 2d pattern, ready to send off to the laser for cutting out of stainless steel.

Split infinitive unrolled

Unrolled surfaces of the 3d model, colored for identification. ^

 

Below are a few images of the initial stages of the assembly. I made a gumby little wooden jig to bend the tight inside curves; the outside curves bend against the "sides", so don't need to be pre-rolled.

Rolling jig

Clampett, Jed

Split Infinitive fabrication

Intersection

Split Inf Secret Sauce

Split Inf adding the base

SI Based

Split Infinitive BeeDubs

I LOVED the piece with just the sanded metal surface, but this one is actually sold, and the client wanted a yellow powder coat. Yellow? :– {

Yellow!? splitinfinitive

SI Exposed ss edges

Split Inf shopshot

Turns out, yellow is SPECTACULAR on this thing. The first image above shows the piece fresh from the powder coater, followed by some shots of the edges being filed back to reveal the shiny stainless underneath. I love the way this iteration came out. Hopefully my clients feel the same - shipped it off a while ago and wondering what they think.

split ininitive yellow

Dutch angle with Japanese maple. Artsiness.

PS: I posted quite bit about the first iteration. Some linkage:

Here, here, over there, and here, too.