Exocubic Studio

Exocubic Studio

CinderCone: How.

Once I decided I wanted to make a chimenea, it was time to address the “How?” I’ve spent 25 years slowly incorporating computer-aided design elements into my work, including patterns that are warped and deformed algorithmically. I had a vague idea of how I wanted the perforated pattern to look, but utilized the “mess with it ‘til it looks good” method to arrive at a layout of hexagons, warped along a curving path. Not to get too far into the weeds, but that curving path acts as an attractor, deforming the hexes more strongly relative to their distance from it.

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<p><p>has-aspect-ratio “ style=“padding-bottom:%;“>Doing a bit of time travel here, but thought this showed the pattern off nicely.

Doing a bit of time travel here, but thought this showed the pattern off nicely.

 

 

Since the humble hexagon was the seed for the pattern, I thought it appropriate to use it as the driving motif for the chimenea’s main form, too. Given that there are some immutable constraints at play - scale, containing the fire, supporting the wood, channeling the smoke, etc. - much of the remaining design choices were just a matter of adjusting the form to allow for said constraints. I worked up the basic shape, then stuck an average-sized human into the scene to check the scale. The initial 40 inch height just felt too small when viewed in this context, so I added a foot. Ta Da!2020-09-11 40in Version w Man.jpg

 

Chimenea with Dood.jpg

 

 

Once I have the design finalized, I lay out all the parts as flat patterns for the laser cutter, then send them off to be cut.

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<p><p>has-aspect-ratio “ style=“padding-bottom:%;“>Chimenea FOR CUT.jpg